rgency declaration, it will underline that he is pushing

  Still, presidential vetoes occur more often than you might think. Every president since Garfield has vetoed at least

one bill. The younger Bush was the first president since John Quincy Adams to go a full four years without a veto, acco

rding to the Congressional Research Service. The House, which was Republican-led for Bush’s entire first term,

was protecting him from bills he opposed. Barack Obama, similarly, had help on Capitol Hill for most of his pr

esidency, just as Trump has. But Obama did veto two bills even when Democrats controlled both chambers of Congress.

  The President with the most vetoes was Democrat Roosevelt, wi

th 635, although he also served the longest in the White House (12 years). All those vetoes cam

e even though Roosevelt enjoyed Democratic majorities for his entire time in the White House.

  If you plot vetoes alongside how closely aligned Congress is

to the president, it used to be quite common for a president to veto bills from a House and Senate ali

gned with him. This data comes from The American Presidency Project at the University of California at Santa Barbara.

www.ash521.cn

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,