The next morning the 2,600-seat auditorium was mobbed. Jobs

The next morning the 2,600-seat auditorium was mobbed. Jobs arrived in a double-breasted

blue blazer, a starched white shirt, and a pale green bow tie. “This is the most important

When asked about his obsessive concern over the look of the factory,

Jobs said it was a way to ensure a passion for perfection:

 

moment in my entire life,” he told Sculley as they waited backstage for the program to begin.

“I’m really nervous. You’re probably the only person who knows how I feel about this.” Sculley

grasped his hand, held it for a moment, and whispered “Good luck.”

 

As chairman of the company, Jobs went onstage first to start the shareholders’ meeting. He

did so with his own form of an invocation. “I’d like to open the meeting,” he said, “with a

twenty-year-old poem by Dylan—that’s Bob Dylan.” He broke into a little smile, then looked

down to read from the second verse of “The Times They Are a-Changin’.” His voice was high-pitched

as he raced through the ten lines, ending with “For the loser now / Will be later to win /

For the times they are a-changin’.” That song was the anthem that kept the multimillionaire board

chairman in touch with his counterculture self-image. He had a bootleg copy of his favorite version,

which was from the live concert Dylan performed, with Joan Baez, on Halloween 1964

at Lincoln Center’s Philharmonic Hall.

Sculley came onstage to report on the company’s earnings, and the audience started to become restless

as he droned on. Finally, he ended with a personal note. “The most important thing that has happened

to me in the last nine months at Apple has been a chance to develop a friendship with

 

Steve Jobs,” he said.

“For me, the rapport

we have developed

means an awful lot.”

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